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KPDS Paragraf / Okuma Testleri 3

SORU
Today, Canada is in the grip of a sudden industrial revolution. While the first, something from the 1860s to the 1960s, shattered the main section of the Canadian economy from agriculture to industry, the new revolution is changing the economy away from traditional smokestack manufacturing industries to those based upon information, services and new technologies. It took the country years to get used to the cultural and social changes resulting from the first industrial revolution, and it would be rashly optimistic to assume that Canadians will not face serious stresses in coming to terms with the changes that are transforming the workplace today.

Q. It can be understood from the passage that the Canadian economy _____ .
a. was, at the beginning, largely an agricultural one
b. was, from the start, based on heavy industry
c. has, over the years, undergone very little radical changes
d. has recently entered a period of recession
e. has invariably kept a balance between agriculture and industry

Cevabı Göster
A

Q. The passage points out that the change in Canada from an agricultural to an industrial economy _____ .
a. was bitterly opposed by a large segment of society
b. was achieved in a very short period of time, actually only about two decades
c. made the use of information technologies indispensable
d. brought with it many new cultural and social conditions which took years to resolve
e. brought little benefit to the country as a whole

Cevabı Göster
D

Q. The author has the opinion that the Canadians_____ .
a. will find the second industrial revolution hard to cope with
b. are closing down heavy industry far too soon
c. don’t pay adequate attention to conditions in the workplace
d. may turn back to an agricultural economy
e. have already lost their control over manufacturing industries

Cevabı Göster
A

SORU
So many books was written on computers, computer programming, and computer programming languages, particularly C++. To write another book on C++, even the newest C++ IV, probably seems difficult to most, and it is with mild anxiety that, I, the author, take place in this project. But, some good reasons can be stated for doing just that. Most computer professionals will agree that the field of computer and information science has quickly become a valid discipline for academia, and that changes are occurring in computer programming languages. Both of these facts demand that a new direction be taken in presenting the subject.

Q. One can understand from the passage that the writer is somewhat apprehensive in case _____ .
a. computer sales should drop sharply
b. developments in computer programming will become more and more costly
c. his book will be felt, by many people, to be superfluous
d. computer programming should be taken over by professionals
e. programming languages should become far more complicated

Cevabı Göster
C

Q. We can understand from the passage that publications on computer technology _____ .
a. are only concerned with C++ computer programming
b. have already reached a very high number
c. are brought out by academia for academia
d. invariably cause a great deal of public reaction
e. are largely repetitive and very costly

Cevabı Göster
B

Q. We understand that the author feels that his new book on C++ is justified because _____ .
a. computer science is a new science with little relevant literature
b. computer professionals have not as yet recognized the changes taking place in computer science
c. it will boost the sale of computers throughout the world
d. it introduces a new approach to computer programming languages
e. it will change the concept of computer science among academia

Cevabı Göster
D

SORU
”Human rights” is a fairly new name for what were previously called ”the rights of man”. It was Margaret Fuller in the 1950s who promoted the use of the expression ”human rights” when she discovered, through her work in the United Nations, that the rights of men were not considered in some parts of the world to include the rights of women. The ”rights of man” at an earlier date had itself replaced the original term ”natural rights” in part, perhaps, for the concept of natural law, with which the concept of natural rights was logically connected, had become a subject of controversy.

Q. The reader is explained the stages by which _____ .
a. the United Nations carries out its procedures
b. Margaret Fuller developed the idea of human rights
c. the term ”human rights” came into use
d. the various ”rights of man” came to be recognized
e. human rights are today being violated throughout the world

Cevabı Göster
D

Q. By referring to Margaret Fuller, the passage explains that before the 1950s, the term ”he right of man” _____ .
a. had always been used in conjunction with ”the rights of women”
b. had come under severe criticism
c. had long been a subject of controversy among politicians
d. had already become irrelevant in world politics
e. had often been misunderstood by some nations

Cevabı Göster
E

Q. It is clear in the passage that the disagreement over the concept of natural law _____ .
a. was actually of no significance in many parts of the world
b. meant that the term ”natural rights” was no longer acceptable
c. forced Margaret Fuller to introduce the term ”human rights”
d. undermined the work of the United Nations
e. was closely connected with the growing recognition of the rights of women

Cevabı Göster
B

SORU
The shopping center emerged in the early 1920s in the suburbs that surrounded American cities. Suburbs of that time were residential and depended on the traditional city centers for shopping. The first suburban commercial centers had three certain features: they consisted of a number of stores built and managed by a single developer; they were usually located at an important intersection, and they provided plenty of free, off street parking. These shopping centers were like small-town shopping districts, both in their architecture, which was carefully traditional, and in their position, which integrated them into the surrounding neighborhood. The stores faced the street and the parking places were usually in the rear.

Q. One can understand from the passage that before the introduction of shopping centers those living in the residential suburban areas _____ .
a. were anxious to keep commercial activities there to a minimum
b. usually preferred to go to nearby small towns in order to do their shopping
c. found parking a great problem when they went downtown to shop
d. had to go into the center of the city to do their shopping
e. felt that shopping facilities could not be integrated into such neighborhoods

Cevabı Göster
D

Q. It is clear in the passage that a popular location for the early shopping centers in the United States was _____ .
a. the very heart of a big city with roads directly serving all the suburbs
b. one near an important road junction with space enough to provide adequate perking facilities
c. the villages bordering on the suburbs of a town since they too would benefit from the facilities
d. a suitable point midway between two or three suburban areas
e. one that was in the hands of a single developer and architect

Cevabı Göster
B

Q. We learn from the passage that the new shopping villages were like small-town shopping areas _____ .
a. since many architects felt these could hardly be integrated effectively into suburban conditions
b. although the stories faced onto the parking lots, not the streets
c. as regards both the architectural style and the arrangement of the building
d. even though the architecture was very different
e. as most developers wanted to bring something new into the commercial activities of the region

Cevabı Göster
C

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